Dial-Up Internet Access for Mac Users

Dial-up internet access for Mac users is fast and easy with EarthLink Dial-up.  But the experience is a little different from that of Windows users.

If you are a Mac user, here’s how you should configure your computer (OS X 10.5) for dial up Internet access with EarthLink:

  1. Open your System Preferences (under the Apple menu).Setting up dial up internet access on a Mac computer
  2. Click the Network icon (in the Internet and Network section).
  3. In the left menu, select either Internal Modem or USB Modem.
  4. In the Telephone Number field, enter an EarthLink dial-up Internet access number that’s local for you (if you don’t have one yet, find a dial-up access number here).
  5. Enter your EarthLink email address in the Account Name field.
  6. Enter your password in the Password field.
  7. Check the box next to Show modem status in menu bar.
  8. Click Apply to complete your dial-up networking setup.

Now, whenever you want to connect to the Internet with dial up, you can click the Connect button on the Network window.

To set up earlier Macs for dial up access, use these tutorials: OS X 10.3 and 10.4 or OS X 10.0 and 10.1.

Don’t Forget to Use EarthLink Accelerator for Faster Dial-Up

We also strongly recommend that Mac dial-up users download EarthLink Accelerator (it’s FREE for all our dial-up access members). With Accelerator installed, you’ll be able to surf the web up to 7x faster than with regular dial-up. And it speeds up email too. So don’t wait — get it now!

New Products from Apple & Microsoft In the News

The two iconic companies that have long represented the personal computer industry to most consumers – Microsoft and Apple – have been making big news in the past couple of weeks, with major computer and mobile product announcements and updates. Lets take a look at what’s new and what it means for you.

Apple – New Laptops, OS X, iOS

New Macbook laptops, OS X, and iOS 6

New Mac Products Unveiled

On June 11, Apple announced updates across its line of laptops. Updates to the base Macbook Pro and Macbook Air were considered good but relatively minor. Most notably, they all got bumped up to the new third-generation Intel “Ivy Bridge” Core processors, which deliver improvements in computer speed, battery life, and graphics performance. The biggest news, however, was the introduction of the very expensive (but some say worth every penny ) Macbook Pro with Retina Display. The laptop is considerably thinner and lighter than other Macbooks (not called Air), but the headline new feature is the high-resolution 2,880×1,800 pixel “retina” display found on the latest iPads.

Read CNET’s reviews of the new Macbook Air, Macbook Pro, and Macbook Pro with Retina Display.

If you’re looking to purchase an Apple computer, prices have already gone down for the previous generation. Here’s a CNET article on how to get the best deal on a previous-generation Macbook.

Deals on the next-gen computers may take a while to materialize.

Apple also announced the July release of its next OS X operating system, called Mountain Lion  (continuing Apple’s big-cat naming convention). The new OS is supposed to be more intuitive, operating more like an iPhone. It will also have much better social network (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) integration, increased iCloud online storage integration (allowing you to seamlessly sync information from computer to phone or tablet), enhanced type-as-you-talk dictation capabilities, and other new features and enhancements. The new OS X will be available for download at $19.99 (or free if you buy a Mac between now and the July release).

Details were also confirmed about Apple’s fall release of iOS 6 for iPhones and iPads. The new mobile OS will boast many improvements to Siri (including iPad support and integration in some cars), greater Facebook integration, a totally new 3-D maps app with turn-by-turn navigation, FaceTime calls over cell networks (not just Wi-Fi), game and photo enhancements, and more. Read all about the coming new iOS 6 here.

Microsoft – New Tablet/Laptop, New Mobile OS

New Microsoft Surface tablet

This Monday, Microsoft did something it had never done before: it showcased a Microsoft branded computer, a versatile tablet called the Surface. On the surface, the Surface may look a bit like the market leader, the iPad. It is similar in size and weight. But a couple of things make the Surface stand out: it has a built-in stand and a cover that converts into a keyboard. The two features – plus the fact that it will run full productivity tools like Microsoft Office – position the Surface more as a laptop replacement than other tablets. The new Microsoft product is expected to launch along with the new Windows 8 operating system  later in the year. Read a review of the Surface by the Wall Street Journal.

And just yesterday, Microsoft a new version of its Windows Phone OS for mobile devices: Windows Phone 8. The new mobile phone OS is expected to give Microsoft a better chance to compete against rivals Android and Apple in the red-hot mobile device marketplace. The new OS is expected to be both more robust and intuitive to use, with attractive features like Live Tiles, which automatically update various kinds of information based on user customization. Another headline feature is a new mobile wallet app that will let users pay for things with their phones and also track and use coupons, loyalty cards, and other shopping information.

While these next-gen phones are getting good initial reviews, they do present one big problem: the current Windows 7 phones will not be able to be upgraded to Windows 8 when it comes out. So if you think you might want a Windows phone, you should probably wait until later in the year when Windows Phone 8 comes out.

 

Mac Flashback Virus Infects 600,000: What Can You Do?

Security has often been cited as one of the big advantages Mac computers have over their Windows counterparts.

Windows users were under constant assault from viruses, Trojans, spyware, and malware of all kinds.

Mac users remained blissfully above the fray. Most never even considered buying or even installing a free computer security program.

Until last week.

Mac Flashback Virus Worldwide Outbreak Map

Where the Flashback Virus Has Spread

More than 600,00 Mac users were found to be infected with the Flashback Trojan, malware that exploits a Java security flaw to install itself on Macs. Most infected computers (56.6%) are in the U.S.

This isn’t the first Mac attack by any means. Just a year ago there was a fairly large attack called MacDefender.

But more people use Macs now and Flashback has gotten a lot of publicity, leading some to say it has, once and for all, ended Mac’s no-virus reputation.

Now for some comforting news for Mac users: though it’s a large infection, Flashback probably has only infected around 1% of Macs according to some estimates.

Secondly, Apple has already launched a couple of updates to identify and protect against Flashback, so if you get a Mac OS update notice, please don’t ignore it. You can also run your Mac’s Software Update at any time.

Keep in mind, however, that Apple’s Flashback security updates are only for OSX v10.7 and v10.6. Users with earlier operating systems who are concerned are encouraged by Apple to disable Java in their browser preferences. Here is more information about Flashback from Apple.

Though Apple is still working on a Flashback detection and removal tool, there are free 3rd party options available now.

Security vendor Dr.Web has a free online tool to check your system for the Flashback malware (specifically, Backdoor.Flashback.39). All you need to do is enter your Mac’s UUID (don’t worry, there are instructions on how to find it). Keep in mind, this is just a detection, not a removal tool.

Another security vendor, F-Secure, is offering a free tool that automatically detects and removes Flashback from your Mac. Download the free tool here and read the installation instructions.

If you are an EarthLink member and Mac user interested in ongoing protection for your computer, you can take advantage of these Special Offers on Norton Security software from our security partner Symantec.

Apple, Google & EarthLink: Playing the Name Game

The really big technology news yesterday was Apple’s long-awaited iPad media event.New iPad shown at Apple's iPad media event.

As with most Apple announcements, this one was preceded by a torrent of rumor and speculation.

Some of it had to do with features: would the new iPad get a Retina display (yes), would it get a better camera (yes), would it get 4G (yes), would it get Siri (not exactly).

But one of the biggest rumors was about the next iPad’s name. Would it be iPad 3 (which was the early favorite) or iPad HD (the hot, late-breaking rumor).

So what was it…HD or 3?

Turns out, neither. The new iPad was just referred to as the new iPad.

If you like to keep score, here’s an iPad rumor scorecard that itemizes the rumors and lets you know who got them right…and wrong.

And just the day before, another little tech company named Google made some announcements on its official blog about names.

Google’s Android Market, which hasn’t been around that long, is already being renamed: to Google Play.

The Google Music and Google eBookstore names will also go away as they are being incorporated into the new cloud-based Google Play.

If you’ve got an Android phone or tablet, look for the Android Market app to be upgraded to Google Play “over the coming days” (sorry we can’t be more specific). Your videos, books, and music apps will also be upgraded under the Google Play umbrella. Any previously purchased apps and media will now be available to you from Google Play.

If you want to check it out, now’s a good time because Google is celebrating the launch of Play by offering special promotions on music, movies, e-books, and apps every day for the next five days.

As for us…no, we didn’t change our name. We’re still EarthLink. But we did make a big name change late last year that some of you may have missed.

We consolidated our growing number of IT, network, and communication services for business (MPLS Networks , Integrated Voice & Data, Hosted Voice, Data Center Services , Cloud Hosting, and too many more to name here) in a new division called EarthLink Business.

The EarthLink Business name may be new to you, but we”re proud to say that the business division is already making a name for itself.