Sharing Your Email Marketing with Social Media

To help EarthLink Web Hosting customers grow their businesses and keep current customers engaged with email marketing, we’ve previously posted about how to create your first marketing emails  and how to track your email marketing results with Announcer Pro.

Announcer Pro is an easy-to-use email marketing tool that’s integrated into the EarthLink Web Hosting Control Center. It is free with all our EarthLink web hosting, ecommerce hosting, and professional website design and hosting plans.

Social Media sharing of email marketing with Announcer Pro

Today we’ll show you how easy it is to integrate your Announcer Pro email marketing with your social media marketing on Twitter and Facebook.

The good news is that once you’re ready to share your email marketing on social media, you’ve really already done all the work: setting up your company info, creating the subject line, choosing an email template, entering your content into the template and, lastly, scheduling and sending out the email.

One reminder when it comes to social media. Today’s post will go over how to share your emails on your company or personal Twitter and Facebook accounts. But don’t forget, it’s ideal if you can also get some of your recipients to share the email on their social networks.

In our first Announcer Pro post, we mentioned that, when you are creating your email, you will have the opportunity to click the checkboxes in the Social Networking section of the Edit Details page (bottom-right) to have Twitter and Facebook icons included with your email. These icons will make it easy for the recipients of your emails share them with their friends and followers.

Here’s how to share your company’s marketing emails with your social networks:

  1. Make sure you are signed into your Facebook and Twitter accounts.
  2. Sign in to your EarthLink Web Hosting Control Center at control.earthlink.net with your email address and password.
  3. Click on the Email tab and then the icon for Announcer Pro.
  4. From the Main Menu tab, you can either click the Social Networking tab at the top of the page or click Try it out under Social Networking on the right side of the page (seen on the screenshot above).
  5. You’ll see a list of all the emails you have created. Click on one that you want to share (both sent and unsent emails are listed, so make sure you choose one that is finished).
  6. Click the Share It button with the F to share on Facebook.
  7. Customize your message for Facebook, choose what group you want to share with (Public, Friends, Close Friends, etc.) and click the Share Link button.
  8. Click the Share It button with the T to share on Twitter.
  9. Write your Twitter message (under 140 characters) and click the Tweet button.

That’s all there is to it. Good luck spreading the word.

Facebook Home – the Not-Quite Facebook Phone

For months now, the Facebook rumors and speculation have been flying:

  • “Facebook is thinking about launching a phone.”
  • “Facebook is going to launch a phone.”
  • “What will the Facebook phone look like?” 
  • “Will the Facebook phone be a Google killer or an Apple killer?” 
  • “When will Facebook finally unveil its phone?” 

New Facebook Home for Android smartphonesWell, the when question has been answered. But what Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg unveiled last Thursday wasn’t exactly the long-rumored and now-expected Facebook Phone. But neither was it just another Facebook mobile phone app. It’s really something in the middle. Something called Facebook Home.

Facebook Home is a kind of super-app that takes over your Android phone’s home and lock screens and fills them with live updates from your Facebook account with a feature called Cover Feed.

With Facebook Home, you’ll not only be able to see your Facebook news feed, including full-screen photos, but you’ll also be able to Like things, comment on posts, or initiate Facebook Messenger Chats. New messages, by the way, will pop up a round icon showing your friend’s face. It’s a new feature called “Chat Heads” that will allow you to chat even while using other phone features.

As Facebook describes it, Home is “the family of apps that puts your friends at the heart of your phone.” Visit the official Facebook Home page for their overview and highlights. There’s also a brief FAQ that covers the basics of using Facebook Home.

But what about some more objective opinions?

Wall Street Journal columnist Walt Mossberg wrote that he “found Facebook Home easy to use, elegantly designed and addictive,” noting that it prompted him to interact with Facebook more than ever. For big Facebook fans, he added, this could be “a big win.”

The New York Times’ David Pogue had a more mixed response, mostly noting the tradeoffs Home users will have to make (loss of easy access to other apps) and some “confusing” aspects of the user interface. In summary, he wrote “everything in Home is attractive, smooth and quick. At the same time, there’s something vaguely incoherent about the whole operation.”

On Mashable, Lance Ulanoff writes that he found the scrolling Cover Feed “undeniably compelling” and that Facebook Home may “suck you back in” if you’ve been drifting away from Facebook. He said in just 36 hours, it prompted him to spend “more time on Facebook than I  have in the past three months.” But, he reminds us that the Cover Feed is expected to get ads at some point in the near future, a feature that “may annoy some people.”

Facebook Home is scheduled to be available tomorrow, April 12, as a free download from the Google Play store on these four Android phones:

  • Samsung Galaxy S III
  • Samsung Galaxy Note
  • HTC One X
  • HTC One X+

Other Android phones will follow. No iPhone, however. Apple’s iOS doesn’t allow the same kind of Home screen takeover that Google’s Android OS does.

And speaking of phones, there is one new phone that’s being called, informally at leaset, the Facebook Phone. It’s the HTC First — as in the first phone to have Facebook Home preinstalled, which Facebook claims is “the best Home experience possible.”

Reviews of the HTC First and its Facebook Home integration were mixed. TechCrunch called the new phone “an impressive first try” and did a nice round-up of other HTC First and Facebook Home reviews.

Living with Social Media

Social media has completely permeated our culture.  No one will be mad if you pass up using super-specific social networking sites and apps (like Pinterest), but you’ll definitely get sideways looks if you tell people you’re not on Facebook.

It’s odd that, with all the popularity of social media, theredon’t seem to be any tips sheets or guides on how to “properly” use it. And that’s exactly why EarthLink has put together a quick cheat sheet to help you with the basics:

BE YOURSELF

When the internet was newer, anonymity was key.  Disguising your true identity with usernames like “HappyMom97” was a socially acceptable way to communicate through your computer.  This is no longer the case.  People want to find you (actual people from your past and present, like your friends, relatives, and coworkers), so it’s expected that you will now use your real name and a real photo in your social media profiles (some sites, like Google+, even require it!).  That being said, please NEVER including sensitive information like addresses, phone numbers, or even your current and past employment (the one exception is LinkedIN, a professional social site where it pays to show off your resume).

WRITE FOR YOUR MOTHER

If you wouldn’t want your mother to read it or see it, don’t post about it or upload a picture of it.  Only share photos of yourself that you’d be proud for an employer to see (the number of employers using social media to check up on applicants and current employees is on the rise), and try to avoid heated discussions.  Those conversations always work better face-to-face, and people reading it can easily take what you say out of context, no matter how well-worded or thought-out it is.

BE FRIENDS WITH…FRIENDS

Only “friend” people you know in real life.  If you get a message from a stranger, feel free to message back (most sites allow messaging…like an in-social-media email…between non “friends”), but don’t “add” them until you’ve met or spoken outside of social media.

KNOW HOW TO COMMUNICATE

  • Send a message if you want it to privately talk to someone
  • Post on a friend’s wall if it’s for a specific person, but one of your or their friends might enjoy what you’re sharing (like a recipe or a video of a sleeping cat)
  • Post a status about something general that all your friends might enjoy (like the deal on lunch you discovered)
  • Only comment on a post or status with something relevant (Example: if the original post is “I adore ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE by The Beatles,” comment “Me too!” and not “I miss you…how are you?”  That’s better for a separate wall post or message.

Use these as a jumping off point to get yourself settled into communicating through social media.  It’s meant to be a fun way to represent yourself online, so have fun with it!

Facebook Announces New Graph Search

New Facebook Graph Search Announced This WeekIs a new type of search headed your way? If you’re a Facebook user, yes.

Just this Tuesday, Facebook held a press conference to announce what it is calling Graph Search.

The search product is considered to be in very early, limited beta, so you can’t go try it out just yet. But you can get on a waitlist to be one of the earlier users.

Is Facebook’s Graph Search going to replace Google or Bing for most users web searching? No.

But it’s not meant to.

The new search is more a way to intelligently leverage the network of people and information you already have within Facebook, rather than extend Facebook into the web search world.

Facebook explains it like this:

“Graph Search and web search are very different. Web search is designed to take a set of keywords (for example: “hip hop”) and provide the best possible results that match those keywords. With Graph Search you combine phrases (for example: “my friends in New York who like Jay-Z”) to get that set of people, places, photos or other content that’s been shared on Facebook.”

Searches, at least at first, will be limited to people, places, photos, and interests. They will also be private, meaning “you can only see what you could already view elsewhere on Facebook.”

Search for Places

You may turn to the new search as a kind of recommendation engine, like Yelp, but based on your network. So you’ll search for nearby restaurants that your friends like.Or a dentist they like.

But you’ll also be able to refine your searches by more personal criteria. You could, for example, search for restaurants liked by your single friends vs. your married friends. Or favorite restaurants of people you went to college with. Or favorite restaurants of people who work at a certain company.

 Search for People

The new search will let you do simple things, like find all your friends that live in your city. But you can get much more granular and specific than that, searching, for example, for friends who like jazz music or running. If you’re planning a trip you may search for friends who’ve been to the destination you’ll be visiting.  When looking for a golf buddy you could search for people who like golf and live nearby.

Search for Photos

Photo search should also be popular, allowing you to find photos by person, place, or date. You can even use it to look back at “photos I like,” photos you’ve commented on, photos from specific trips (e.g., “photos of me at the grand canyon”), or times (“photos of friends in 2007”). Your photo search doesn’t have to be limited to your own photos either.

Search for Interests

Like the place searches, interest searches will often be used to find recommendations, such as “music my friends like.” Again, you will be able to use the searches to find recommendations of people with similar tastes outside of your network of friends, such as “movies liked by people who like movies I like” (which is the kind of thing Netflix has done well). You can also use the search to find out the tastes of different subsets of people, such as “books read by school teachers” vs. “books read by authors” vs. “books read by CEOs.”

Want to learn more? Check out Danny Sullivan’s Up Close with Facebook Graph Search at SearchEngineLand.com.

Remember, the new Facebook Graph Search won’t be widely available for months. But it looks like it will be an interesting, useful, and fun addition to the Facebook experience.